Tag

brittle bone disease

flying with a wheelchair

The Challenges of Flying with a 400 Pound Wheelchair

My blog this week was supposed to tell you guys about the amazing art teachers I've had throughout my career, but the experiences I had with my wheelchair over the weekend flying to Maine and back inspired me to switch it up a bit. Don't worry, art teachers are soon to come. A couple of months ago, Mom and I were given a unique opportunity to plan a trip to anywhere in the United States we'd like to visit at little cost to us. We chose to head to Maine, a trip we've wanted to take for several years, to visit a some close f[...]
child abuse

“Looking Up” Excerpt: Caged? Child Abuse?

Parents of children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta are often charged with child abuse, simply because their kids always turn up with broken bones. My muscles can break my bones when they contract, making it seem like my bones break at random. You can see where, especially if a child has a lower severity of OI, parents are blamed when the child shows up hurt at school and can’t say how they hurt themselves. Well, my parents have also been charged with child abuse, though for a slightly different reason… My parents ar[...]
wheelchair control

10 Useful Gadgets Brought to You by People With Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Having Osteogenesis Imperfecta, or Brittle Bone Disease, certainly poses some unique problems for those of us with short limbs and limited mobility. Here are ten gadgets/adaptive technological advances that help actual people with OI as well as other disabilities. 1. Wheelchairs: This one is pretty obvious, but most of us with the more severe forms of Osteogenesis Imperfecta (Types 3/4) use electric wheelchairs for mobility. Most of us use one of Permobil's models because they are technologically the most advanced and e[...]
Katherine's early art

Why I Got Into Art

When I was little (in the younger sense as I am still little in the physical sense), I drove my parents absolutely bonkers. Because I didn't have to learn to crawl or walk, I learned to talk very quickly, and was speaking in full sentences at ten months old. Ordering people around came as a natural skill, and I was bored all the time. That got a bit better when my mother insisted that my doctor help us get my first motorized wheelchair when I was two, but when I didn't have something to keep me occupied, I got cranky. Eve[...]